beauty machine

What if you could only have one spray gun?

I really love to make assumptions of different kind. What if … I was invisible, what if I was a millionaire, what if you had limitless resources for your paint shop or bodyshop? The last one actually was a title for my blog post sometime ago. Here is another one: “What if I had just one spray gun for all my jobs?”

I sell spraying equipment for bodyshops for quite a long time now. Modern spray guns producers compete in consumption, ergonomics and design. New, sexy models appear virtually every year, tempting us to buy one. It is almost like with new models of smart phones, so when a new one comes, you absolutely need it. However, if you could only have a choice to keep one, what spray gun would it be? Please do not misunderstand me; I do not advocate using one and only spray gun in any bodyshop, big or small. Far from it, I suggest that spray guns are vital tools of a trade, and a sprayer absolutely must have minimum three guns: one for basecoats, one for clearcoats, and one for more viscose materials like fillers and primers.

What if

Which technology to choose from?

Before actually picking the preferred model, I would like to say a few words about the atomization technology, which is the most versatile to spray different coatings, both basecoats and clears. Remember the assumption, only one gun for all final coating jobs!

Unfortunately, in our industry we have in general a problem with standardizations (recall the post about MS and HS clearcoats)? Similarly, categorization of different spraying technologies is prone to questionable terminology. I will simplify and distinguish three main spray gun systems:

  • High pressure
  • HVLP
  • Trans-Tech or RP (reduced pressure). You can also meet a term LVLP, which means Low Volume Low Pressure, but it is not as common.

High-pressure spray guns choice I would drop first for its high material consumption and non-compliance to various legislations.

HVLP or Reduced Pressure?

By definition, they key difference between two technologies is that HVLP uses lower pressure in air cap, which is compensated with high volumes of air to atomize and deliver the paint with desirable finish results. Trans-Tech (or RP) alters the balance between pressure and air volume. Air cap pressure in RP is about 2,5 times higher (about 1.6 Bar), and therefore less air volume is needed (smaller compressor output as well required). Putting aside all technicalities, Trans-Tech spray guns allow us to spray better than HVLP such materials as HS and UHS clearcoats, without compromising the quality of basecoat application though. I vote for Trans-Tech/High Efficiency (Devilbiss), RP (SATA) or similar technology.

Gtipro Lite

Which spray gun is the one and only?

I have to admit that after being a distributor for Devilbiss equipment for more that ten years, I am bias. If I had to choose just one spray gun for application the final coatings in my bodyshop, it would be GTIPRO LITE TE10 with 1.3 fluid tip. Here is why:

– TE10 High Efficiency is probably the most all-around air cap in Devilbiss range. It is highly recommended for spraying both basecoats and clears (including UHS) by the majority of leading paint brands.

– Ergonomic gun body

– Lightweight – only 446 gms

– GTIPRO Lite gives the possibility to switch easily between different nozzles without the need to change the air cap.

– Low air consumption – 270 l/min

– Low material consumption

– Smooth, kick free control

 

And what is your spray gun of choice?

 

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